Top 5 Reads for Creative Entrepreneurs

You’re sitting in front of your laptop working on your collab from three months ago. You’re now thinking to yourself “ I should get paid for this.” Being a creative entrepreneur doesn’t happen overnight.

However, the best way to stay motivated is to learn from those who are where you want to be. The best way to do that? Cracking open a book!

The beauty in reading is that there is no limitation to what you can learn. You could read the same book hundreds of times and each time you’ll probably notice something new.

Below I’ve listed five books that you should not only read more than once but annotate!

Leave Your Mark by Aliza Licht

Licht is best known for being the PR mastermind for the Donna Karen New York fashion company.

In her award-winning book, Licht talks about her journey from being a pre-med student to becoming one of the most popular personas in PR history!

She’s open about experiences and explains in depth what she learned from them. Along with those experiences, Licht provides some amazing tips for beginners in the professional world. These range from how to deal with competition to interview etiquette!

Licht’s story is remarkable because of how persistent and consistent she was with her efforts to get her dream job. From this book, I hope you see the benefits of never compromising your goals.

#Girlboss by Sophia Amoruso

The founder and executive chairman of NastyGal and girlboss.com takes us on a wild journey from her humble beginnings as a young adult to running an empire by her early 30s. Amoruso’s narration is a fresh breath of air.

She presents her experiences as a young woman with a dream as milestones. Every budding entrepreneur knows that every now again you will experience bouts of doubt.

Amoruso reminds us to turn our bad times into good lessons. There are going to plenty of failures in your journey to building your brand, but they become a loss when you aren’t learning from them.

One thing to remember is the difference between a loss and a failure. Even winners fail sometimes, but they work to never make that failure happen again — hence why they are winners.

The only way is up in the game of entrepreneurship — Amoruso seems to be playing pretty well, and after reading this book, you will be too.

Power Your Happy: Work Hard, Play Nice, and Build Your Dream Life by Lisa Sugar

Founder and President of POPSUGAR, Lisa Sugar reminds us that there is no specific timeline to success.

It’s healthy (sometimes even necessary) to plan ahead in order to achieve certain goals, but it’s important to remember that you will get everything you deserve when you are ready to have them.

Your journey as a young entrepreneur may be dragged out over years or maybe you’ll be an overnight success.

No matter what your timeline is, don’t let it be a key determiner of your success. Even the greatest things can take the longest to manifest.

Year of Yes: How to Dance it Out, Stand in the Sun, and Be Your Own Person by Shonda Rhimes

Creator and executive producer of three award-winning shows, Shonda Rhimes, shows how saying yes to yourself can open (and close) many doors.

Sometimes you need to know when to limit yourself.

Taking every opportunity that comes your way isn’t always the best move. In this case, you are saying yes to keeping your peace. Trust me when I say that maintaining your inner peace is something you’ll need to prioritize while running a business.

In entrepreneurship, sometimes taking a day off will feel like you’re procrastinating or falling behind. With this book, you’ll learn of the importance of investing into yourself as much as you do with your craft.

Smart People Should Build Things by Andrew Yang

Andrew Yang, the founder of Venture for America, breaks down his solution to America’s economic and political problems. As an entrepreneur, it is important to understand how the economy works.

After all, you are the primary beneficiary of our capitalist economy, so it would be in your best interest to keep track of its ups and downs. You will better understand why it’s important to fully pursue your entrepreneurial goals.

Yang emphasizes the lack of economically beneficial opportunities for young people nowadays. His solutions encourage you to retain your motivation for building your business.

If you would like to have more specific details about this read, then check outAshley May’s article, “A Book in 5 Minutes”.

Look, we all know the only serious reading you’ve done lately was the Starbucks board menu. Pick up these books from your local Barnes & Noble and get started on your creative entrepreneurial journey.

Remember, Stay Social.

Jewels Clark